5 Symptoms of a Weakened Immune System

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Can I be born just having a weak immune system? A healthy diet should be high in fruits, vegetables, and lean proteins, and low in excess sugar, fat, and alcohol. Immunodeficiencies happen when a part of the immune system is missing or not working properly. For example, antibodies in a mother's breast milk give a baby temporary immunity to diseases the mother has been exposed to. We have already impacted the lives of hundreds of people that we know and love personally, and we need your help to bring that into the thousands, millions , and beyond.

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Immune System

The immune system, which is made up of special cells, proteins, tissues, and organs, defends people against germs and microorganisms every day. In most cases, the immune system does a great job of keeping people healthy and preventing infections.

But sometimes problems with the immune system can lead to illness and infection. The immune system is the body's defense against infectious organisms and other invaders. Through a series of steps called the immune response, the immune system attacks organisms and substances that invade body systems and cause disease.

The immune system is made up of a network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to protect the body. One of the important cells involved are white blood cells, also called leukocytes, which come in two basic types that combine to seek out and destroy disease-causing organisms or substances. Leukocytes are produced or stored in many locations in the body, including the thymus, spleen, and bone marrow. For this reason, they're called the lymphoid organs. There are also clumps of lymphoid tissue throughout the body, primarily as lymph nodes, that house the leukocytes.

The leukocytes circulate through the body between the organs and nodes via lymphatic vessels and blood vessels. In this way, the immune system works in a coordinated manner to monitor the body for germs or substances that might cause problems. A number of different cells are considered phagocytes.

If doctors are worried about a bacterial infection, they might order a blood test to see if a patient has an increased number of neutrophils triggered by the infection. Other types of phagocytes have their own jobs to make sure that the body responds appropriately to a specific type of invader. The two kinds of lymphocytes are B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes. Lymphocytes start out in the bone marrow and either stay there and mature into B cells, or they leave for the thymus gland, where they mature into T cells.

B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes have separate functions: B lymphocytes are like the body's military intelligence system, seeking out their targets and sending defenses to lock onto them. T cells are like the soldiers, destroying the invaders that the intelligence system has identified. These cells trigger the B lymphocytes to produce antibodies, which are specialized proteins that lock onto specific antigens.

So if someone gets sick with a certain disease, like chickenpox, that person usually won't get sick from it again. This is also how immunizations prevent certain diseases. An immunization introduces the body to an antigen in a way that doesn't make someone sick, but does allow the body to produce antibodies that will then protect the person from future attack by the germ or substance that produces that particular disease.

Although antibodies can recognize an antigen and lock onto it, they are not capable of destroying it without help. That's the job of the T cells, which are part of the system that destroys antigens that have been tagged by antibodies or cells that have been infected or somehow changed. Some T cells are actually called "killer cells. Antibodies also can neutralize toxins poisonous or damaging substances produced by different organisms.

Lastly, antibodies can activate a group of proteins called complement that are also part of the immune system. Complement assists in killing bacteria, viruses, or infected cells. All of these specialized cells and parts of the immune system offer the body protection against disease. This protection is called immunity.

Other vitamins and minerals in watermelon are also good for your heart. These include vitamins A, B6, C, magnesium and potassium 1. Inflammation is a key driver of many chronic diseases. Watermelon may help lower inflammation and oxidative damage, as it's rich in the anti-inflammatory antioxidants lycopene and vitamin C 1.

In a study, lab rats were fed watermelon powder to supplement an unhealthy diet. Compared to the control group, they developed lower levels of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein and less oxidative stress In an earlier study, humans were given lycopene-rich tomato juice with added vitamin C. Overall, their markers of inflammation went down and antioxidants went up. Watermelon has both lycopene and vitamin C As an antioxidant, lycopene may also benefit brain health.

For example, it may help delay the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease Lycopene is found in several parts of the eye where it helps protect against oxidative damage and inflammation. It may also prevent age-related macular degeneration AMD. This is a common eye problem that can cause blindness in older adults 1. Lycopene's role as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound may help prevent AMD from developing and getting worse. Citrulline, an amino acid in watermelon, may reduce muscle soreness.

One small study gave athletes plain watermelon juice, watermelon juice mixed with citrulline or a citrulline drink. Both watermelon drinks led to less muscle soreness and quicker heart rate recovery, compared to citrulline on its own The researchers also conducted a test-tube experiment, investigating the absorption of citrulline.

Their findings suggest that citrulline absorption is most effective when it's consumed as a component of watermelon juice. Other research has also looked at citrulline's potential to improve exercise endurance and performance.

So far, citrulline doesn't seem to improve exercise performance in the amounts studied, but it's still an area of research interest Two vitamins in watermelon — A and C — are important for skin and hair health. Vitamin C helps your body make collagen, a protein that keeps your skin supple and your hair strong. Vitamin A is also important for healthy skin since it helps create and repair skin cells. Without enough vitamin A , your skin can look dry and flaky. Both lycopene and beta-carotene may also help protect your skin from sunburn Watermelon contains lots of water and a small amount of fiber — both of which are important for healthy digestion.

Fiber can provide bulk for your stool, while water helps keep your digestive tract moving efficiently. Eating water-rich and fiber-rich fruits and vegetables, including watermelon, can be very helpful for promoting normal bowel movements.

Watermelon is a surprisingly healthy fruit. It has a high water content and also delivers many other important nutrients, including lycopene and vitamin C. These nutrients mean that watermelon isn't only a tasty low-calorie treat — it's also very good for your health. It can help you lose weight, reduce inflammation, and cleanse your body of toxins - or at least that's what the Internet chatter would have you….

This is an evidence-based review of watermelon, with detailed information on its health benefits, nutrient content, plant compounds and more. The possible benefits of watermelon rind include better heart health, and even a better time in bed. If you're diabetic or just watching your daily sugar intake, these fruits are good options to try.

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2. You don't exercise.