The one Nutrisystem promo code that changed my life

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Vegetarian Diet
Who knew that more is sometimes less? You eat three Jenny Craig meals plus a snack per day, and supplement with fruit, vegetables and dairy. I just wanted to say that this post is awesome, well written and lots of useful Nutrisystem info. I wore that bikini on the beach and have fun buying new clothes in a size 4! Why Bill and Melinda Gates put 20, students through college. That being said, I still utilize diets like Nutrisystem from time-to-time, when I feel like I need a re-charge, or to quickly burn off some extra weight. Having been on Nutrisystem has also made it easier for me to now walk away from unhealthy food choices.

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As one descended the social ladder, bread became coarser, darker, and its bran content increased. In times of grain shortages or outright famine, grains could be supplemented with cheaper and less desirable substitutes like chestnuts , dried legumes , acorns , ferns , and a wide variety of more or less nutritious vegetable matter.

One of the most common constituents of a medieval meal, either as part of a banquet or as a small snack, were sops , pieces of bread with which a liquid like wine , soup , broth , or sauce could be soaked up and eaten. Another common sight at the medieval dinner table was the frumenty , a thick wheat porridge often boiled in a meat broth and seasoned with spices.

Porridges were also made of every type of grain and could be served as desserts or dishes for the sick, if boiled in milk or almond milk and sweetened with sugar. Pies filled with meats, eggs, vegetables, or fruit were common throughout Europe, as were turnovers , fritters , doughnuts , and many similar pastries. By the Late Middle Ages biscuits cookies in the U. Grain, either as bread crumbs or flour, was also the most common thickener of soups and stews, alone or in combination with almond milk.

The importance of bread as a daily staple meant that bakers played a crucial role in any medieval community. Bread consumption was high in most of Western Europe by the 14th century. Estimates of bread consumption from different regions are fairly similar: Among the first town guilds to be organized were the bakers', and laws and regulations were passed to keep bread prices stable.

The English Assize of Bread and Ale of listed extensive tables where the size, weight, and price of a loaf of bread were regulated in relation to grain prices.

The baker's profit margin stipulated in the tables was later increased through successful lobbying from the London Baker's Company by adding the cost of everything from firewood and salt to the baker's wife, house, and dog. Since bread was such a central part of the medieval diet, swindling by those who were trusted with supplying the precious commodity to the community was considered a serious offense.

Bakers who were caught tampering with weights or adulterating dough with less expensive ingredients could receive severe penalties. This gave rise to the " baker's dozen ": While grains were the primary constituent of most meals, vegetables such as cabbage , chard , onions , garlic and carrots were common foodstuffs. Many of these were eaten daily by peasants and workers and were less prestigious than meat.

The cookbooks, which appeared in the late Middle Ages and were intended mostly for those who could afford such luxuries, contained only a small number of recipes using vegetables as the main ingredient.

The lack of recipes for many basic vegetable dishes, such as potages , has been interpreted not to mean that they were absent from the meals of the nobility, but rather that they were considered so basic that they did not require recording. Various legumes , like chickpeas , fava beans and field peas were also common and important sources of protein , especially among the lower classes.

With the exception of peas, legumes were often viewed with some suspicion by the dietitians advising the upper class, partly because of their tendency to cause flatulence but also because they were associated with the coarse food of peasants.

The importance of vegetables to the common people is illustrated by accounts from 16th-century Germany stating that many peasants ate sauerkraut from three to four times a day. Fruit was popular and could be served fresh, dried, or preserved, and was a common ingredient in many cooked dishes. The fruits of choice in the south were lemons , citrons , bitter oranges the sweet type was not introduced until several hundred years later , pomegranates , quinces , and, of course, grapes.

Farther north, apples , pears , plums , and strawberries were more common. Figs and dates were eaten all over Europe, but remained rather expensive imports in the north. Common and often basic ingredients in many modern European cuisines like potatoes , kidney beans , cacao , vanilla , tomatoes , chili peppers and maize were not available to Europeans until after , after European contact with the Americas, and even then it often took considerable time, sometimes several centuries, for the new foodstuffs to be accepted by society at large.

Milk was an important source of animal protein for those who could not afford meat. It would mostly come from cows, but milk from goats and sheep was also common. Plain fresh milk was not consumed by adults except the poor or sick, and was usually reserved for the very young or elderly. Poor adults would sometimes drink buttermilk or whey or milk that was soured or watered down.

On occasion it was used in upper-class kitchens in stews, but it was difficult to keep fresh in bulk and almond milk was generally used in its stead. Cheese was far more important as a foodstuff, especially for common people, and it has been suggested that it was, during many periods, the chief supplier of animal protein among the lower classes. There were also whey cheeses , like ricotta , made from by-products of the production of harder cheeses.

Cheese was used in cooking for pies and soups, the latter being common fare in German-speaking areas. Butter , another important dairy product, was in popular use in the regions of Northern Europe that specialized in cattle production in the latter half of the Middle Ages, the Low Countries and Southern Scandinavia.

While most other regions used oil or lard as cooking fats, butter was the dominant cooking medium in these areas. Its production also allowed for a lucrative butter export from the 12th century onward.

While all forms of wild game were popular among those who could obtain it, most meat came from domestic animals. Domestic working animals that were no longer able to work were slaughtered but not particularly appetizing and therefore were less valued as meat.

Beef was not as common as today because raising cattle was labor-intensive, requiring pastures and feed, and oxen and cows were much more valuable as draught animals and for producing milk.

Mutton and lamb were fairly common, especially in areas with a sizeable wool industry, as was veal. Domestic pigs often ran freely even in towns and could be fed on just about any organic waste, and suckling pig was a sought-after delicacy.

Just about every part of the pig was eaten, including ears, snout, tail, tongue , and womb. Intestines, bladder and stomach could be used as casings for sausage or even illusion food such as giant eggs. Among the meats that today are rare or even considered inappropriate for human consumption are the hedgehog and porcupine , occasionally mentioned in late medieval recipe collections.

In England, they were deliberately introduced by the 13th century and their colonies were carefully protected. They were of particular value for monasteries, because newborn rabbits were allegedly declared fish or, at least, not-meat by the church and therefore they could be eaten during Lent.

A wide range of birds were eaten, including swans , peafowl , quail , partridge , storks , cranes , larks , linnets and other songbirds that could be trapped in nets, and just about any other wild bird that could be hunted.

Swans and peafowl were domesticated to some extent, but were only eaten by the social elite, and more praised for their fine appearance as stunning entertainment dishes, entremets , than for their meat. As today, geese and ducks had been domesticated but were not as popular as the chicken , the fowl equivalent of the pig. But at the Fourth Council of the Lateran , Pope Innocent III explicitly prohibited the eating of barnacle geese during Lent, arguing that they lived and fed like ducks and so were of the same nature as other birds.

Meats were more expensive than plant foods. Though rich in protein , the calorie -to-weight ratio of meat was less than that of plant food. Meat could be up to four times as expensive as bread. Fish was up to 16 times as costly, and was expensive even for coastal populations.

This meant that fasts could mean an especially meager diet for those who could not afford alternatives to meat and animal products like milk and eggs. It was only after the Black Death had eradicated up to half of the European population that meat became more common even for poorer people.

The drastic reduction in many populated areas resulted in a labor shortage, meaning that wages dramatically increased. It also left vast areas of farmland untended, making them available for pasture and putting more meat on the market.

Although less prestigious than other animal meats, and often seen as merely an alternative to meat on fast days, seafood was the mainstay of many coastal populations. Also included were the beaver , due to its scaly tail and considerable time spent in water, and barnacle geese , due to the belief that they developed underwater in the form of barnacles.

The Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II examined barnacles and noted no evidence of any bird-like embryo in them, and the secretary of Leo of Rozmital wrote a very skeptical account of his reaction to being served barnacle goose at a fish-day dinner in Especially important was the fishing and trade in herring and cod in the Atlantic and the Baltic Sea. The herring was of unprecedented significance to the economy of much of Northern Europe, and it was one of the most common commodities traded by the Hanseatic League , a powerful north German alliance of trading guilds.

Kippers made from herring caught in the North Sea could be found in markets as far away as Constantinople. Stockfish , cod that was split down the middle, fixed to a pole and dried, was very common, though preparation could be time-consuming, and meant beating the dried fish with a mallet before soaking it in water.

A wide range of mollusks including oysters , mussels and scallops were eaten by coastal and river-dwelling populations, and freshwater crayfish were seen as a desirable alternative to meat during fish days.

Compared to meat, fish was much more expensive for inland populations, especially in Central Europe, and therefore not an option for most. Freshwater fish such as pike , carp , bream , perch , lamprey and trout were common. While in modern times, water is often drunk with a meal, in the Middle Ages, however, concerns over purity, medical recommendations and its low prestige value made it less favored, and alcoholic beverages were preferred. They were seen as more nutritious and beneficial to digestion than water, with the invaluable bonus of being less prone to putrefaction due to the alcohol content.

Wine was consumed on a daily basis in most of France and all over the Western Mediterranean wherever grapes were cultivated. Further north it remained the preferred drink of the bourgeoisie and the nobility who could afford it, and far less common among peasants and workers.

The drink of commoners in the northern parts of the continent was primarily beer or ale. Juices , as well as wines, of a multitude of fruits and berries had been known at least since Roman antiquity and were still consumed in the Middle Ages: Medieval drinks that have survived to this day include prunellé from wild plums modern-day slivovitz , mulberry gin and blackberry wine.

Many variants of mead have been found in medieval recipes, with or without alcoholic content. However, the honey -based drink became less common as a table beverage towards the end of the period and was eventually relegated to medicinal use. This is partially true since mead bore great symbolic value at important occasions. When agreeing on treaties and other important affairs of state, mead was often presented as a ceremonial gift.

It was also common at weddings and baptismal parties, though in limited quantity due to its high price. In medieval Poland , mead had a status equivalent to that of imported luxuries, such as spices and wines. Plain milk was not consumed by adults except the poor or sick, being reserved for the very young or elderly, and then usually as buttermilk or whey. Fresh milk was overall less common than other dairy products because of the lack of technology to keep it from spoiling.

However, neither of these non-alcoholic social drinks were consumed in Europe before the late 16th and early 17th century. Wine was commonly drunk and was also regarded as the most prestigious and healthy choice. According to Galen 's dietetics it was considered hot and dry but these qualities were moderated when wine was watered down. Unlike water or beer, which were considered cold and moist, consumption of wine in moderation especially red wine was, among other things, believed to aid digestion, generate good blood and brighten the mood.

The first pressing was made into the finest and most expensive wines which were reserved for the upper classes. The second and third pressings were subsequently of lower quality and alcohol content. Common folk usually had to settle for a cheap white or rosé from a second or even third pressing, meaning that it could be consumed in quite generous amounts without leading to heavy intoxication.

For the poorest or the most pious , watered-down vinegar similar to Ancient Roman posca would often be the only available choice. The aging of high quality red wine required specialized knowledge as well as expensive storage and equipment, and resulted in an even more expensive end product. Judging from the advice given in many medieval documents on how to salvage wine that bore signs of going bad, preservation must have been a widespread problem.

Even if vinegar was a common ingredient, there was only so much of it that could be used. In the 14th century cookbook Le Viandier there are several methods for salvaging spoiling wine; making sure that the wine barrels are always topped up or adding a mixture of dried and boiled white grape seeds with the ash of dried and burnt lees of white wine were both effective bactericides , even if the chemical processes were not understood at the time.

Wine was believed to act as a kind of vaporizer and conduit of other foodstuffs to every part of the body, and the addition of fragrant and exotic spices would make it even more wholesome.

Spiced wines were usually made by mixing an ordinary red wine with an assortment of spices such as ginger , cardamom , pepper , grains of paradise , nutmeg , cloves and sugar. These would be contained in small bags which were either steeped in wine or had liquid poured over them to produce hypocras and claré.

By the 14th century, bagged spice mixes could be bought ready-made from spice merchants. While wine was the most common table beverage in much of Europe, this was not the case in the northern regions where grapes were not cultivated.

Those who could afford it drank imported wine, but even for nobility in these areas it was common to drink beer or ale , particularly towards the end of the Middle Ages. In England , the Low Countries , northern Germany , Poland and Scandinavia , beer was consumed on a daily basis by people of all social classes and age groups.

For most medieval Europeans, it was a humble brew compared with common southern drinks and cooking ingredients, such as wine, lemons and olive oil. Even comparatively exotic products like camel 's milk and gazelle meat generally received more positive attention in medical texts.

Beer was just an acceptable alternative and was assigned various negative qualities. In , the Sienese physician Aldobrandino described beer in the following way:. But from whichever it is made, whether from oats, barley or wheat, it harms the head and the stomach, it causes bad breath and ruins the teeth , it fills the stomach with bad fumes, and as a result anyone who drinks it along with wine becomes drunk quickly; but it does have the property of facilitating urination and makes one's flesh white and smooth.

The intoxicating effect of beer was believed to last longer than that of wine, but it was also admitted that it did not create the "false thirst" associated with wine. Though less prominent than in the north, beer was consumed in northern France and the Italian mainland. Perhaps as a consequence of the Norman conquest and the travelling of nobles between France and England, one French variant described in the 14th century cookbook Le Menagier de Paris was called godale most likely a direct borrowing from the English "good ale" and was made from barley and spelt , but without hops.

In England there were also the variants poset ale , made from hot milk and cold ale, and brakot or braggot , a spiced ale prepared much like hypocras. That hops could be used for flavoring beer had been known at least since Carolingian times, but was adopted gradually due to difficulties in establishing the appropriate proportions. Before the widespread use of hops, gruit , a mix of various herbs , had been used.

Gruit had the same preserving properties as hops, though less reliable depending on what herbs were in it, and the end result was much more variable.

Another flavoring method was to increase the alcohol content, but this was more expensive and lent the beer the undesired characteristic of being a quick and heavy intoxicant.

Hops may have been widely used in England in the tenth century; they were grown in Austria by and in Finland by , and possibly much earlier. Before hops became popular as an ingredient, it was difficult to preserve this beverage for any time, and so, it was mostly consumed fresh. Quantities of beer consumed by medieval residents of Europe, as recorded in contemporary literature, far exceed intakes in the modern world. For example, sailors in 16th century England and Denmark received a ration of 1 imperial gallon 4.

Polish peasants consumed up to 3 litres 0. In the Early Middle Ages beer was primarily brewed in monasteries , and on a smaller scale in individual households. By the High Middle Ages breweries in the fledgling medieval towns of northern Germany began to take over production. Though most of the breweries were small family businesses that employed at most eight to ten people, regular production allowed for investment in better equipment and increased experimentation with new recipes and brewing techniques.

These operations later spread to the Netherlands in the 14th century, then to Flanders and Brabant , and reached England by the 15th century. Hopped beer became very popular in the last decades of the Late Middle Ages. When perfected as an ingredient, hops could make beer keep for six months or more, and facilitated extensive exports.

In turn, ale or beer was classified into "strong" and "small", the latter less intoxicating, regarded as a drink of temperate people, and suitable for consumption by children. As late as , John Locke stated that the only drink he considered suitable for children of all ages was small beer, while criticizing the apparently common practice among Englishmen of the time to give their children wine and strong alcohol.

By modern standards, the brewing process was relatively inefficient, but capable of producing quite strong alcohol when that was desired. One recent attempt to recreate medieval English "strong ale" using recipes and techniques of the era albeit with the use of modern yeast strains yielded a strongly alcoholic brew with original gravity of 1.

The ancient Greeks and Romans knew of the technique of distillation , but it was not practiced on a major scale in Europe until some time around the 12th century, when Arabic innovations in the field combined with water-cooled glass alembics were introduced.

Distillation was believed by medieval scholars to produce the essence of the liquid being purified, and the term aqua vitae "water of life" was used as a generic term for all kinds of distillates.

Alcoholic distillates were also occasionally used to create dazzling, fire-breathing entremets a type of entertainment dish after a course by soaking a piece of cotton in spirits. It would then be placed in the mouth of the stuffed, cooked and occasionally redressed animals, and lit just before presenting the creation. Aqua vitae in its alcoholic forms was highly praised by medieval physicians. In Arnaldus of Villanova wrote that "[i]t prolongs good health, dissipates superfluous humours, reanimates the heart and maintains youth.

By the 13th century, Hausbrand literally "home-burnt" from gebrannter wein, brandwein ; "burnt [distilled] wine" was commonplace, marking the origin of brandy. Towards the end of the Late Middle Ages, the consumption of spirits became so ingrained even among the general population that restrictions on sales and production began to appear in the late 15th century.

In the city of Nuremberg issued restrictions on the selling of aquavit on Sundays and official holidays. Spices were among the most luxurious products available in the Middle Ages, the most common being black pepper , cinnamon and the cheaper alternative cassia , cumin , nutmeg , ginger and cloves.

I really appreciate your inspiration! I am so glad I stumbled upon this. Much like you, I grew up in the kitchen. Much like you, I adore good! Much like you, I also have sciatica although I have that nagging pain in my right buttock- not my left. And much like you, I never really enjoyed the gym, although I love being active if that makes sense. I also just recently moved to Seattle, and I sold my car. I walk to work now 2 mi round trip and everywhere else I can.

I hope that my lifestyle change can help me succeed like it has for you. You have inspired me to stay positive and keep trying. I have to ask… in your exercise history, where were those hiking pictures taken? I thought to myself they looked like Mt. Then again, every hiking picture makes me think of Mt. I love this blog…found it just now on pintrest. Your blog is incredible — so beautifully-crafted and organized… I simply want to gobble it up!

You are definitely being book-marked: I love that you are so real! I love this blog, and I hate blogs — I tend to find them boring: I also adore that you have a firm grasp on the English language and grammar weird, I know, but verbiage really bothers me! I have been reading your blog for a couple of weeks now after stumbling across it on Pinterest, and I just had to tell you how much I adore you and your site. As a college student, you make weight loss and maintenance seem attainable—not an easy feat.

Thank you for sharing your story. You really are an inspiration… And quite witty, I might add! This is such a cool blog. There are so many blogs yet so few that really get a person. Bookmarking for many futures. I just found your blog while searching Pinterest for yummy recipes… you are an inspiration! Thank you for writing everyday and telling your story the good and bad.

I love your heartfelt writing, your candor and your honesty. I resolve to plan ahead with lunch this year. I do pretty well on dinners but love the prepare salad veges ahead of time idea. I am also loving the fluffy oatmeal recipe, off to try it now although here in Australia is it 30 degrees celcius here, our summer and may be a little hot!

I love the plan ahead nature of breakfast too. If I was to make a massive pot for five days would I just times all the ingredients by 5? I am so excited to find this site. Thank you for sharing your story with everyone, I am happy to know that there is someone out there that did look like me and successfully changed there life, I have been up and down on my weight since I can remember, I have started eating right and exercising more, but I do enjoy the good things but in moderation.

Thank you and good luck on your ventures. I love your site. I am so glad I found it. I was at my heaviest recently lbs and I am now down to and my first goal is to reach lbs. Thank you for sharing your very inspirational and motivating story. I am so excited to hear that you are writing 2 books. Thank you so much Amy!

Yes, the first book to be released Spring will be a weight loss memoir. The second is a cookbook: I just happened upon your blog and love, love, love it! I came across your blog through Pinterest. I am so inspired by your story and your journey! I also struggled and continue to sturggle with my weight. Hearing your story is def great motivation and inspirational.

I cant wait to try some of your recipes and i also cant belive you lost weight in Italy!! So excited to start my journey.

First of I am from Walpole so this is exciting and am currently in the whole weightloss stage, I have more to loose than you and you are inspiring. It makes me feel so good to read this blog and encourages me. I just need to make changes and move more. Thank you for this. So I have finally decided to leave a comment. I come and check on your blog about twice a week for the past year or so. Can You Say for Dinner? I literally had to come to this post to find that your name is Andie. So hello Andie Mitchell, my name is Kyle.

I just wanted to thank you for the many amazing recipes and stories. I have been a pescetarian for the past 4 years and your blog gave me that love for food again. Seeing your pictures of the beauty of food has made me appreciate it again. It has really grown into a passion for me, thanks to you. So I just wanted to thank you. His all time favorite is the Roasted Broccoli. He can never have enough!!

I have tried 2 of the recipes already and am doing another tonight. I am diabetic and trying to lose 35lbs and you have recipes in here that I can eat and not feel guilty. I love Your blog. The recipes are a blast and fun! And thanks for sharing your journey. So appreciate What You Do! You are a great writer and your story of weight loss is one that I share.

I will be back for more. I found your blog from a recipe posted on Pinterest by one my favorite authors Laurie Notaro. I have been eating better and living a generally better lifestyle for a few months now, and all the good ideas I can find, the better! Thanks for the help!!! I have struggled with my weight for most of my 39 years. Thank you for sharing….

What a wonderful, inspiring blog!! Thank you so much for sharing your journey with us— and continuing to do so: I am so excited to have found you! You are honest with yourself and here on your blog.

You have given me inspiration to be a better person for me. The candy store by my house makes a jalapeno stuffed with peanut butter, dipped in chocolate. They ship too, but I think that you should make them and then make a blog post about how to make them, so I can make them too! I love your website. I have been overweight all my life, like you I reached a point not long ago where it was scary… so far I am 20lbs lighter and still moving. The sad thing is I actually work in fitness, I help other people get healthy but for a long time I had a false perception of myself.

Your blog has added a whole new outlook to some of the ideals I have been looking into. I just wanted to say thank you! I will recommend this to many of my clients. I am embarking on this journey myself. Your blog is my new favorite website!

You are a gem and an absolute inspiration! I look forward to your books. I am officially your new fan: So hello, my name is Michelle and I am now an official Andie follower: I just spent the last several minutes reading through your weight loss journey.

I am now hoping to keep coming back and checking in on you and your blog. I have to tell you, that your story was so impressional not only because of the success, but also because in the one photo of you with a friend uncovering a grill, you look so much like my own 20 year old daughter! We have both been eating healthier for the past few months and we have both taken off over 15 pounds, but we have a long ways to go.

You are a real cutie! Great choices of food and recipes. Absolutely great food photography. Hello beautiful lady and lover of food, A friend of mine who follows my blog shared a link with me, your fab blog and I am so glad to meet you.

Please come to my blog and we will have a cup of musings together. We have much in common. I am also hoping to publish a book which would be the ultimate achievent for a whimsical dyslexic but quietly determined chocolate lover like me.

Just another thing, how do you even go about being published? I have a great idea and almost manuscript for a book but I dont know what to do now? I found the buffalo chix wraps on Pinterest, then read more of your blog. Interesting story, great writing.

Funny I have been a runner from high school. But I do think geez…do I have to work out the rest of my life? It feels great to be healthy and strong, but sometimes it feels like an endless chore! I cried all the way through your bio posts… Everything you said, from the injury to the semester in Italy, resonated with me.

I am rethinking my goals as I begin my get-healthy journey. I am going to stay tuned for whatever else you have in store! I nominated you for the Sunshine Award! You can find the picture at http: Rules for the Sunshine Award: Link the award to the person who gave it to you. Answer the questions that come with it.

Pass it along to 10 people and let them know they have received it. Hi Andy I love your travel adventures, my boyfriend and I are planning on going to Cancun this summer, coud you tell me how did you transport from Cancun to Belize and CostaRica at a low cost? You are hilarious, gorgeous, real, fantastic, and addictive. Maintaining is my biggest fear looming somewhere in the future — thanks for calming me down.

I just love your website! The more I find in it, the more I love it. I found you on Pinterest and am so glad I did! Thank you for sharing your journey…and you recipes! I found your website looking for a whipped frosting. I look forward to reading about your weight loss and how to keep it off. I stumbled across this page thanks to pinterest!

I have been trying to get into a more healthy habits like eating and exercising, but the food I always see looks horrible and I am not a big fan of exercising either! After reading a few of your blogs so far, I am truly inspired to lose some weight and even become Paula Deen along the way.

Your recipes look amazing and you are truly an inspiration for many! I will definitely be purchasing both of your books once they are on the market! A beautiful story from a beautiful person. You are where I dream to be one day.

P and now I am on the path at 7 or so lbs. Interestingly I have found through journaling that my eating habits though not the best were not the main problem. I need to constantly remind myself to just get up and move every day and things will happen. Your bit about the green field being the same whether you are lying and crying or spinning and laughing… well something to that effect have touched me!

Andie, I just came across your site today, and just spent the past two hours reading as much as I could! You are an extremely good writer, and I feel as if I know you by just reading your words. Your journey amazes me and inspires me, and I guess I just want to say thank you. I look forward to trying some of your recipes, and because of you I now have a strong sudden urge to go on a nice relaxing walk. I love your site and thanks for the granola bar recipe yesterday!

Looking forward to knowing more about you and your recipes. I am really looking forward to trying out your recipes they all look so delicious and healthy! I think your recipes will be a great help over the next year!! Accidentally found your blog while searching for can tuna recipes and loved your blog!

Your story is so inspirational and so true! Thanks for sharing your story and keep me motivated: Thanks for sharing your story and keep me motivated! I have no words except WOW! You are an amazing person, and an inspiration for so many! I was searching for dinner ideas on Google and your site came up. I clicked on it and began reading, and was teary-eyed when I finished! Thank you, thank you for sharing your life story.

I am going to read every single post on your site! Reading about your exercise history and what you miss from pounds ago help to put a lot of things into perspective. Thank you for your experience and your honesty. Thanks for taking the time to share! Happened to find your blog by chance on pinterest! And never too late to write about it either-thanks for the inspiration! I nominated you for the Versatile Blogger Award! I just finished reading your entire blog.

All the stories and scanned a few recipes. I laughed and cried. But mostly just gave myself time to chew on the truths presented and how they mirrored many of my own struggles.

Thank you for sharing you life, heart, struggles and triumphs! I have been blessed by you and your blog this morning. And, have taken away many nurturing offerings that I will continue to chew on and apply to my life. I am currently in the midst of my weight lost journey and when I started, I tried to find other success stories from women of my same height and weight… which is incredibly close to yours… and also I love food… good food… and travel.

After reading all of your post I found a kindred spirit. Someone who loved the feel of good fashion and cheap junk food: Your blog has been an inspiration and above that I adore really good writing, which you master in a wonderful, simple, enthralling way.

I stubbled upon your blog and I have been reading for 2 hours now! You are my new inspiration! I have slowly been losing for the past 2. I focus on food instead of the people or activity at family gatherings and social events. I research healthy eating, plan meals, make grocery lists.

Food consumes my life and I feel trapped in a prison. When I try to control my portions and diet, I miss the quantity of food- not the type of foods necessarily. What I really want is love from my parents. Addiction to food does seem the hardest to break free from compared to all other addictions.

We need food to survive. There are times I wish I could. I envy people who eat without having any thoughts or emotions while they eat. But I can see, like you said, that I have to make peace with it. I need to view food for what it really is- not as my enemy or as my source of love. In November , during the fall semester of my senior year at college, I reached my goal weight.

I had more energy and confidence. I could wear clothes I wanted to and truly felt pretty. I felt strong and fearless, like I could do anything I tried rock-climbing, white-water rafting, scuba diving after I was able to lose the weight. Just as you described, I had no idea how to maintain this weight loss and live a balanced life in relation to eating and exercise. That is when I decided that I have to make some changes in my life. Me being healthy and around for my family is more important than anything in this world.

I said to myself that I would eat right every single day. I tried dieting for months and have starved for days, nothing seemed to work out. Was about to give up and saw success stories of people online by using Nutrisystem. Nutrisystem was my last resort. Nutrisystem has delicious recipes loaded with protein, fiber and smart carb. Once you signup and choose your plan, you will be given 4-week meal plan according to your height, weight, age, and gender. You can choose your favorite meals, and it will be at your doorstep in days.

You can enjoy their delicious meal and lose weight. It worked for me; I lost 26 lbs.

What you should know: I believe in balancing health and happiness.